Category Archives: Advertising

Aside

If you’re part of the working crowd, you know Starbucks. You might even say you need Starbucks, depending on the time of day. And besides the fact that we’re in a Dunkin’ Donuts town, we can all acknowledge that Starbucks … Continue reading

The Best Brands Using Vine // Lowe’s


When you’re thinking of  great commercials you’ve seen or clever marketing pieces, you might not come up with the name Lowe’s. This doesn’t say much for its marketing besides the fact that little of it sticks out to a consumer who isn’t already interested in Lowe’s (read: is not an adult male over the age of 40). So one might wonder how they would do with a younger-minded social media tool like Vine.  And the answer? BRILLIANTLY.

They’ve taken an opportunity to shove a product in someone’s face and turned it around to be a friendly tools-and-tips giver.

First, they tooled around for the 4th of July. Got some playing out of the way:

And then came the good stuff. Dig through the tweets with the hashtag #LowesFixinSix and you’ll find awesome tips, from how to unscrew a stripped screw, how to keep your paintbrush bristles from bending while drying, to suggestions that make decorating easier.

The best part? People are digging it. The tips are actually helpful and people want their friends to know – the perfect situation for huge success in a viral campaign. Can’t wait to see what Lowe’s comes up with next.

The Best Brands Using Vine // Target


Target is known for its style: simple, geometric, and most importantly, catchy. Their commercials don’t pitch their products at you. You’re just watching TV and somehow find yourself in the middle of a funky world where things are symmetrical and the music is great. From cake mix to beach gear to oatmeal, they’ve managed to maintain an organized playfulness throughout all of their marketing. Enter, Vine. Expectations were high, and Target didn’t disappoint.

They started with a bang, kicking off their 6-second video account with an origami stop-motion.

Right?! Pretty ambitious for a first-timer, but Target has a reputation and they know it.

Flash forward to this summer, and all the buzz surrounding their #SummerUp Decision Maker. Don’t know what you feel like doing? Tap and you’ll pause it on anything from “Build a Fort” to a photo of a jump rope.

Later on, they marked the beginning of football season with a clever Pickles vs. Pretzels toss of the pigskin (well, tortilla).

And as the days got shorter and we dragged ourselves inside for the winter, Target was there. With caramel apple tips, jack-o-lanterns a-plenty, and a nod to 1985’s Duck Hunt:

We were very interested to see what they’d come up with for the post-Thanksgiving weekend shopping frenzy, and were pleasantly surprised to find they’d revamped their summer Decision Maker. Make friends with your buddy in line on Black Friday! Well, it’s too late now but hang on to the link for next year.

The Best Brands Using Vine


With the release of Vine earlier this year, the whole landscape of posting something online changed. No longer were we chained to the constricting option of one particular moment in time, we could get it all. Or, almost all of it. 6 second videos had just enough time to capture the feeling of an event, or the hilarious mistake and the laughter afterwards.

But then a great thing happened: brands began to see it as an easy advertising opportunity. Skip the 30-second commercial, Vine is where the people are and Vine is free. They’ve really taken advantage of the opportunity to tell a quick story, very often pitching their product in a way that isn’t “pitchy” at all.

Dunkin’ Donuts. In an ironic twist, there was a lot of buzz surrounding Dunkin’ Donuts for their being the first to use the free app to create a commercial to air on television during Monday Night Football’s pregame show on ESPN. Vine is valuable tool for brands to create an overlap between television and social media campaigns, and Dunkin’ Donuts did a great job keeping people interested and engaged.

Samsung. With Samsung’s place as a hefty competitor in the tablet race, it’s no surprise they chose to spotlight their variety of mobile devices in one of their best Vines. A basketball player runs through three different phones or tablets before slam dunking on a fourth.

Another Vine brings ants to the scene of a picnic. A flat strawberry on  smartphone comes to life and the ants carry it away. Samsung definitely has fun with the app, so a viewer barely notices they’ve been slapped with advertising for the last 6 seconds. Because it’s barely a slap.

Oreo. We know Oreo is on top of their social media. And we’ve seen Oreos dunked in every possible way, so it’s fun to see how that cleverness translates to six seconds of stop-motion.

Etsy. The online crafty-creative community is the perfect company to experiment with stop-motion, and they did just that. Though none of them had experience with stop-motion beforehand, they went into each Vine prep with an open mind and a willingness to be flexible with the materials. A favorite:

Coming up, two pros of the Vine world: Lowe’s and Target.

A Pop-Up Book Made to Sell a Phone?


Who’d have thought, a few years ago, that a pop-up book would be the highlight of a commercial for an elegant, new mobile phone? Certainly not us. It’s a strange, hilariously wonderful juxtaposition of the new and the old, the kitschy-handmade and the chic-sleek.

The video for Samsung’s GALAXY Note 3:

Catching Up With Kristin (Pt. 2)


Hmm, where’d we leave off? Oh, right. Creative industry unemployment is looking up, digital, video, and mobile jobs are in demand, and we started delving into the world of acquiring and retaining employees.

So, alright. It seems like opinions about the value of creative departments have been changing a little bit lately. Any thoughts on that?

Creative departments often look for the perfect, all-knowing candidate. A superman of creative skills, if you will. Though their intentions are in the right place, a shift is starting to occur where directors are realizing the professional value of developing the needed skills within their current employees, rather than spending excessive amounts of time seeking candidates that have all the necessary skills. They’re starting to consider the solution of maintaining a steady, solid staff, and supplementing it with more specialty-experienced contractors.

Does that mean the market of employable creatives is shifting towards contract-work?

Yeah! We’re actually finding that the recession has steered a lot of companies and creatives towards more contractual work. Since the economy has begun to recover, a little over half of all new roles have been contract roles. 40% of in-house agency Creative Directors plan to hire freelancers this year as well. Perhaps the best part is that it’s given these directors the opportunity to hire temp-to-perm. 75% of my clients grow their creative department this way.

With a decent percentage of agencies and companies competing for freelancers, what advice would you give them to ensure they’re getting the cream of the crop?

Simply put: compete. Put forth the best, most interesting work and the freelancers you attract will reflect that. Treat your contractors like a full-time member of your team, give them opportunities to develop their skills, and be honest and up front about setting expectations. Also, be open to hiring for aptitude and culture over hard and fast skills. People that are both adaptable to your company culture and capable of learning quickly will be valuable members of your team, even if they don’t fulfill your grocery list of technical skills.

We will be checking in with our lady-in-the-know regularly from now on, so stay tuned!

Talent Spotlight! – Kelly, Integrated Project Manager


Kelly_bwMotivated by challenge and highly ambitious, Kelly W. is an Integrated Project Manager who finds both strategic and tactical work satisfying. She discovered her love of digital and interactive while researching a website relaunch in her first job, and has looked forward to being a part of that evolving space ever since. In various Integrated Project Manager roles, Kelly has had a hand in everything from Print, Out-of-Home, Television, Radio, Non-Traditional (POP, R&D, Station Domination), In-Branch Merchandise & Internal Branding, Branded Campaigns and Conceptual Projects. She thrives in a team that is enthusiastic and driven towards success.

Jeanine Chandler, Lead Career Advocate, knows she can rely on Kelly to get the job done and recommends her to all of CM Access’s clients. Kelly recently completed a CMA assignment as an Interactive Project Manager for a travel and lifestyle marketing agency that works with premier brands. Detail oriented and personable, she managed web banners, helped with digital resourcing, kept the team on track with deadlines and priority changes, garnered client feedback and conceived, developed and delivered a dynamic status Filemaker database for resource tracking. Jeanine received excellent feedback on Kelly’s work.

Kelly finds freelance and project based work very satisfying, as it allows opportunities to grow her skill set while providing flexibility. She’s looking to make a contribution to an assignment that is both strategic and tactical. Are you ready to benefit from Kelly’s project management skills? Give CM Access a call today: 800-330-4110.

Talent Spotlight – Kip, Creative Strategist


With almost 20 years in graphic design, marketing and advertising under his belt, Kip is an accomplished Creative Director and Strategist. Not only is he a pro at delivering compelling content to target markets using the hottest channels and dead-on tone, he’s also worked with the full spectrum of clients, from design firms to internal corporate departments. His skills range from the ability to follow a company’s style guideline to the expertise to create a strategic marketing program from a blank slate.

Currently on assignment as a Packaging Production Artist, Kip’s creative vision has made a real contribution to each CM Access client he’s worked with. Career advocate Jason DeVito calls out Kip’s deep understanding of the creative and post-production process, enabling him to quickly jump right into solutions to creative and technical challenges.

Kip is especially eager to work on projects that involve innovative products or services that are in need of full marketing programs. He enjoys having a hand in each step of the process: evaluating the market, creating an image and launching a multi-platform campaign, giving him the opportunity to use “all the crayons in the box.” From strategy to typography, design and layout, he finds working with decision makers and sharing the satisfaction of partnership rewarding.

Kip has a strong sense of responsibility to meet clients’ objectives while keeping it fun and exciting. He never loses sight of the fact that creative plays a major role in the success of a company. Working with Kip, you know his eyes are “on the prize.” He drives profit and controls expenses by budgeting resources to align with revenue opportunity, influencing internal stakeholders and selecting the right resources to deliver cost effective solutions. Quite simply, he’s a creative who delivers results.

Could your business benefit from a creative strategist like Kip? Contact CM Access today!

Check out a few samples from Kip’s portfolio:

PINK. PINK. PINK.


Have you noticed that everything is going pink this October?  Designated as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, many organizations are “thinking pink,” bringing both hope and awareness to breast cancer awareness, treatment, education and research.  Companies are embracing creative ways to utilize the breast cancer awareness pink ribbon and pink branding for the cause.

The NFL not only looks good in pink, it has brought the playing field full circle. Adding the famous pink ribbon to the turf, pink accents on the referees’ wrist bands and players sporting pink gloves and cleats, our eyes gravitate more to the muscular men in pink…well maybe that’s just us. Their campaign, “A Crucial Catch,” in partnership with the American Cancer Society, is focused on the importance of annual screenings, especially for women who are 40 and older.  Great job NFL!

 

Food, cosmetics, apparel and fragrances are all on the pink band wagon. As Ralph Lauren saddles up to support their Pink Pony Fund through sales of apparel and fragrance products, Tide Detergent is re-branding their look to bring awareness.  Panera Bread shows support through their “Pink Ribbon Bagel,” donating a portion of each sale to support breast cancer research. The concept dates back to 2001, when Sue Stees, co-owner of 18 Panera Bread franchises and a breast cancer survivor, began searching for ways to help other women fighting the same disease.

Even 5-Hour ENERGY is joining the pink campaign! They’ve introduced a new Pink Lemonade flavor packaged in a bright pink bottle, available through December 31, 2012, and will donate a portion of each sale to the Avon Foundation for Women Breast Cancer Crusade.

Do you think pink campaigns are raising awareness of breast cancer? Have you incorporated pink into your designs this month? 

When Branding Takes the Wrong Turn – The Ad That Didn’t Win Gold…


Creating your brand.   Whether it’s your personal brand as a creative – or the brand you contribute to creating while on the job – a brand can be the expression of a product or service that will set you and your company apart.  Pretty important and powerful stuff…wouldn’t you agree?

So I was very perplexed recently when I saw a particular act of branding during the Summer Olympic Games, and it grabbed my attention – but not in a good way.

You probably know what I’m referring to…the new Apple ads.

There was just something about these ads that I couldn’t put my finger on.  My first reaction was…”Oh, that’s an Apple ad?  Hmmm.”  As I saw them a few times more, my inner voice started sounding even more perplexed, scratching its head and saying, “Huh?  What IS this?”

And I wasn’t alone.

The essence of Apple technology and the way their branding appealed to the consumer gave us confidence in our user experience and the ease of use of our Apple products – from creating in the workplace, to depending on our iPhones to jogging with our iPod.

So why is Apple now alluding to the fact that we’re dumb, their products are difficult to use, and this Genius guy is getting annoying, (and we usually love Geniuses!)

Many are saying that Steve Jobs wouldn’t have approved of this ad, and it’s undermining the tone and essence of the Apple brand he created.

What do you think?  Is this “thinking differently?”